AHEAD OF THE CLASS

Best Practices in Volusia County Grades 6-8

 

 

     A special thank you to the following teachers for sharing their best practices with their colleagues in Volusia County.  Professional sharing of innovative ideas provides teachers with the necessary tools to inform them of current educational practices, support the highest quality instruction, and inspire higher levels of student achievement in the classroom.

 

Lesson Plans for Math


Take Me Out to the Ball Game!
By Kristy Kuches, Heritage Middle School
2011 Volusia County Teacher of the Year

q  Divide class into two teams. 

q  One team is at bat.   One student at bat selects question to do at board

q  Can choose a “single” a “Double” a “Triple” or a “homerun” question. 

q  Level of difficulty explained prior to game. 

q  A single = low order  to Home Run = FCAT style question.  

q  Everyone in class completes the questions on their white boards, but “batter” is the one whose answer receives points.  

q   We played 2 strikes (incorrect answers by batters) and you are out, due to time constraints.

q  Easy to differentiate instruction: allows all students to feel successful, while still being exposed to more difficult material.  The children NOT at bat were able to quietly assist one another as needed.  They are practicing for their turn at bat.  

q  No one wants to go up to the overhead and ask for a “single” so those lower students are motivated to work with a peer in their seats to correctly answer a “double”

q  Everyone can experience success, exposed to higher level questions, and playing a game!  Students don’t even realize they are working!!!!

Here are some examples of leveled questions:

Multiplication

       Single  = basic facts up to 12 x 12

       Double = two digits number over 12 times a single digit number

      ex: 23 x 8

       Triple = two digit times two digit (over 12 x 12) …..so maybe 34 x 16

       HR = Fcat word problem in which multiplication would be used for the solution.  Something like…..Antonio went to the farmer’s market and purchased 3 pounds of apples at $1.49 per pound and  5 pounds of pears  at $1.69 per pound.  How much did Antonio spend at the farmer’s market.

Equations

       Single = one step equations…..x – 5 = -13   or -7x = 42

       Double = Two step equations …..    4x – 8 = 12   

       Triple = two step equations with distributive property or combining like terms……-9(x + 6) = 108   or       -4y + 9y + 12 = 62

       Home Run = an FCAT question using an equation to solve it.  

Lesson Plan for Language Arts


Laura Kieselbach

Heritage Middle School

8th Grade Language Arts

https://sites.google.com/site/kieselbachsclass/

 

"I See Your True Colors"

Lesson: Using Colors Creatively
A Guide to Brighten up Your Writing
IMAGERY
Involves any of the five senses
Visual: seen in the mind’s eye
Auditory: represents a sound
Olfactory: pertains to smell
Gustatory: represents a taste
Tactile: sense of feeling
Allows the reader to experience your writing
SIMILE
Compares two otherwise unlike things, using like or as
The bright blue water shone like the hot, yellow sun.
My mother’s touch was as gentle as a white, cuddly lamb.
His soft cream skin was cold as ice.
Can include other figurative language
His explanation was as clear as thick, dark, black mud.  = Exaggeration
Makes descriptions - and your writing - more vivid
Personification
Giving human traits (qualities, felling, actions, or characteristics) to non-living objects (things, colors, qualities, ideas)
Gives new ways to look at everyday items
The dry, brown summer grass ached for water.
The bright yellow stars winked at us through the night sky.
Winter wrapped its icy white claws around the north.
Emphasizes your writing & makes it stand out
Let’s Practice!
Take five minutes to look at the paint sample you’ve been given.
List as many creative writing techniques as you can, about that color.
Example – Red… the car was candy apple red, her hair was red like the
crisp leaves in fall, the red in her eyes screamed anger
When time is called, you will pass your sample to the left, getting a new color and doing it again.


Laura Kieselbach

Heritage Middle School

8th Grade Language Arts
https://sites.google.com/site/kieselbachsclass/ 

  LESSON: Using Sensory Details to Enhance Persuasive Advertising Techniques (3 Days)

1. Objective

Students will use a minimum of 10 specific sensory details to describe a car they wish to sell to the general public.

DAY 1:

2. Activate Prior Knowledge

Bell Ringer: Play a commercial that uses specific sensory imagery and have students write down the examples they hear using the attachment (appendix A).  Ask them to also jot down how the advertisers are using persuasion to appeal to the general public.  (approximately 5 minutes)

3. Discuss Student Prior Knowledge

Discuss bell ringer - ask for 1-2 volunteers to read some of their responses.
(3 minutes)

4. Input (teaching)

Begin lesson : Using a rather large car, if available, display it to the class (as an alternative, the overhead works well to project a picture image from the internet).  Talk about the car with the students – ask for DETAILS!!! Write their descriptions on the board and discuss the things you cannot see on the car.  Include interior features, safety options, etc. (could take between 20-30 minutes depending on the class size and participation)

5. Check for Understanding

Ask students, at random, to turn one of the descriptions into a line an advertiser might use to sell the car to the general public. Be sure they are using ample sensory imagery to determine understanding. (10 minutes)                                      

6. Student Practice

DAY 2:

Break students into groups of 3-4.  Have a representative from each group pull a car from an opaque bag so that the choice is random.  Hand out the attached form (appendix B) and have students complete it after brainstorming the car they have pulled.

(about 30 minutes)

 DAY 2-3:

Once the front is complete, the group will turn over the handout and write an ad to sell the car they have chosen. A visual accompaniment is optional on the ad – they can create the entire ad from scratch if they do not wish to use the template.  An abundance of computers will need to be accessible to allow this option.

This activity will ask them to intertwine both the use of sensory imagery and persuasive techniques.  Remind them of the commercial and how the advertisers used a combination of the two to appeal to the public. The ad must detail the car in a practical and effective way.

(about 30 minutes)

Once the advertisement has been written, students will present their ad as a “commercial” to the class. You can allow students to vote on the car they would most likely buy to determine an advertising  “winner”.

(about 20 minutes, depending on the number of groups)

 ***KEEP IN MIND: This is NOT a summative assessment and no official grade should be assigned.  This is an activity to help students understand how to use sensory imagery and what role appeal plays in the use of persuasive techniques.  This can be a formative assessment but any grade given should NOT affect their overall score in the class. ***

 7. Wrap-Up

Do not remind students of what they learned, instead ASK them.  Allow them to lead discussion on how this activity helped them understand the dual purpose of the lesson.  You can have students fill out an exit slip, if you wish (appendix C).

  CAR LESSON BELL RINGER SHEET

 

 

SENSORY DETAILS

 

PERSUASIVE APPEAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s All About the DETAILS!!!

Take some time to look over the car your group has chosen.  Consider the element listed – tires, wheels, paint, etc. List as many details as you can about that element – all terrain, aluminum alloy, fire engine red, etc. Be sure to discuss with your group members to be as SPECIFIC and DESCRIPTIVE as possible.

·        Car(year/make/model)                                                    

·        Color                                                                        

·        Price                                                                         

·        Tires                                                                         

·        Wheels                                                                     

·        Windows                                                                  

·        Safety Features                                                                               

·        Sound system                                                                  

·        Special Features                                                                               

                                                                               

                                                                               

                                                                                

 

 Now that you have all the features that make your car unique, write an “ad” to sell it to a buyer.  Be sure you make the car appealing and be specific enough so that the interested party will have few, if any, questions after hearing/reading it.  Remember the “why” of this lesson – IT”S ALL ABOUT THE DETAILS!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                           

Exit Slip for Lesson Conclusion and Reflection

EXIT SLIP   

Name: _____________________________________________________________________________                  

Today I learned                                                                                                                                               

I am still unclear about__________________________________________________________________ 

Student Curriculum Map by Kevin Alligood, Science Teacher, Silver Sands Middle

 

Nature of Science : Weeks 1-4                August 22nd-September 16th

Big Idea 1: The Practice of Science

What are the differences between scientific theories and laws?

How does inquiry lead to the acquisition of new scientific knowledge?

Big Idea 2: The Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge

What makes science, science?

Big Idea 3: Characteristics of Scientific Knowledge

What does science study?

What is the difference between a law and a theory?

Weeks 1-2

What is Science?

Experiment vs. Investigations

Theory & Laws

Students will:

· explain that science is the study of the natural world.

· give examples and non-examples of science

· set up a science notebook that will be used all year by students.

· develop a class list of lab safety procedures in the lab

SC.7.N.1.3
SC.7.N.2.1

science
science notebook
scientist
non-example
scientific reasoning

Students will:

· compare and contrast the difference between an experiment (control

group and variables) and other types of scientific investigations

· discuss examples of scientific knowledge not derived from

experimentation

· describe methods used in pursuit of scientific knowledge in different fields

of science (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics)

SC.7.N.1.3

SC.7.N.1.5

Inference
observation
methods
experiment
control group
investigation
variables
biology
chemistry
geology
physics

Weeks 1-2

What is Science?

Experiment vs. Investigations

Theory & Laws

Students will:            SC.7.N.1.3 + SC.7.N.2.1

     explain that science is the study of the natural world.

      give examples and non-examples of science.

      set up a science notebook that will be used all year by students.

      develop a class list of lab safety procedures in the lab.

     Vocab : science, science notebook, scientist, non-example, scientific
                    reasoning.

Students will:             SC.7.N.1.3 + SC.7.N.1.5

     compare and contrast the difference between an experiment (control

      group and variables) and other types of scientific investigations

     discuss examples of scientific knowledge not derived from 

     experimentation

     describe methods used in pursuit of scientific knowledge in different

     fields of science (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics)

Vocab : inference, observation, methods, experiment, control group,                 

              investigation, variables, biology, chemistry, geology, physics.

 Students will:                        SC.7.N.3.1

     recognize and explain the difference between theories and laws.

     discuss how scientific theories are different than other theories.

Vocab : theories, laws.

  
 

 

Music Evaluation Sheets for Middle School Band by Krissy Butrico, Heritage Middle School

coming soon